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Sabreliner Corporation celebrates the 50th anniversary of the certification of the Sabreliner business jet

St. Louis, MO / December 13, 2013 – The Sabreliner began as the Air Force T-39, built to military specifications for strength, performance and flying qualities, including the ability to stand up to 4G maneuvers. In 1963, those same high standards were incorporated into the world's first twin-engine business jet, the Sabreliner Model 40.

Four additional models (60, 75, 75A/80, 65) and millions of flying hours later, the Sabreliner family of corporate aircraft boasts an indisputable record of dependable, fast and comfortable executive transportation. Pilots like the Sabreliner's reliability and handling characteristics, often describing it as the most stable and responsive corporate aircraft ever to fly. Passengers enjoy its comfortable and spacious interior as well as its exceptionally smooth ride.

"It all began 50 years ago with an aircraft who's first flight launched an entire industry. And many of those first aircraft off the production line are still in service today, proving that quality and the can-do Missouri spirit are timeless. We're proud of our plane and we're proud of our people," said Sabreliner President and Vice Chairman Susan Aselage.

A total of 631 Sabreliners were built before production ended in 1982, and 232 aircraft are still in service including 42 Sabre 40s which were produced until 1968. Of the 76 Sabre 65s produced between 1979 and 1982, 72 remain in service.

"The forward-thinking spirit that gave rise to the Sabreliner fleet of aircraft is alive at Sabreliner today," added Aselage. "We continue to serve Sabreliner aircraft owners and operators in addition to providing maintenance, interior and paint services to corporate and military clients. In recent years, we've done more Learjet phase inspections than anyone including the OEM, completed helicopters for heads of state around the world, and inspected KC-135s for the Air Force's Center for Aircraft Structural Life Extension. Today's Sabreliner is evolved, relevant and ready."

Sabreliner Corporation: With locations in Perryville and Ste. Genevieve, MO, Sabreliner Corporation is a diversified aviation services company recognized worldwide for its extensive expertise and capabilities for government, military and business aviation customers. Specializing in airframe, engine, and component modification, inspection, repair, and overhaul, Sabreliner is widely recognized for its ability to keep veteran aircraft in service while being equally qualified to perform aircraft completions to the highest standards. Sabreliner offers complete exterior paint services, interior redesign, as well as major avionics upgrades and installations. The company is a full-service maintenance, repair and overhaul facility.

Sabreliner’s extensive in-house engineering and manufacturing capabilities enable it to fabricate airframe structural assemblies, parts and tooling for use in new fixed and rotary-wing aircraft production, and for repair and overhaul of existing aircraft. Parts and assemblies are produced in accordance with government specifications, under license from OEMs and under FAA Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA). For more information, visit www.sabreliner.com or call 314-863-6880.

Contact: Ann Hein 314-578-4975 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

DOM (Director of Maintenance), Sabreliner Services

Tracy Ogle - Vice President, Strategic Development & Helicopter Services - Sabreliner Corporation

A Military Start

Ogle joined the Army when he was 17 years old. He was a crew chief, performing maintenance on Blackhawk helicopters. His first assignment was at Fort Lewis, WA. He was assigned to the first Blackhawk helicopter battalion that was west of the Mississippi. “We did a lot of RDF rapid deployments,” he shares. “In the army, a crew chief works on everything from the nose to the tip of the rotor blade. I was involved with engine maintenance, rotary system maintenance, as well as airframe maintenance, avionics and electrical troubleshooting.”

The Army gave Ogle plenty of opportunities to expand his aviation knowledge and experience. During his tenure at Fort Lewis, Ogle was selected to attend a rigid four-month inspector course at Fort Eustis, VA. He learned all types of NDI and more in-depth systems operations for all Army aviation assets. He spent a year in Korea with a Medivac unit as a technical inspector (TI). After Korea, Ogle returned to Fort Eustis where he taught the inspector course and also trained entry-level students. After that, he went to Panama with a Medivac unit where he served as a supervisor of maintenance.

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Ogle was in Panama for five years before moving to an intermediate maintenance facility where he worked in production control. He then went to Savannah, GA, for a few years as a platoon sergeant for a general support aviation company. From there, Ogle went to Belgium and supported the Supreme Allied Commander, Europe for six years. Upon returning from Belgium, he went to Andrews Air Force Base. His last assignment was as the director of maintenance for the Army jet detachment. The Army jet detachment had a fleet of Gulfstream (GIII, GIV, and GV) and Citation (560) aircraft. Ogle retired from the Army at Andrews.

Ogle shares that he originally signed up for a three-year enlistment. “Twenty three years later, I decided I needed to grow up and figure out what I was going to do,” he says jokingly. “I got out and stayed in aviation.”

Getting an A&P

Ogle knew that he wanted to work in aviation when he retired from the Army. He knew that having an A&P certificate would be an important part of landing a civilian aviation job. While he was stationed in Belgium, he came back to the states and went to Oklahoma City to take a course to get his A&P certificate.

The Civilian World

Upon retirement, Ogle went to work as an Army contractor for the Military District of Washington as a program manager. He managed VIP transport aircraft that supported the Military District of Washington. After that, he went to work for Sabreliner Corporation as a program manager for rotary wing programs. He then moved on to vice president of operations. Four months ago, he was named the vice president of Strategic Development and Helicopter Services. He currently manages the helicopter program for Sabreliner and also has a broader role of strategic development, developing new business and new opportunities for Sabreliner.

Helicopter Work at Sabreliner

When Ogle first joined Sabreliner Corporation, the company had no helicopter business. With company CEO F. Holmes Lamoreux’s support, Ogle was able to bring in a new product line to the company — helicopter modifications and VIP completions. “One of the things we were instrumental in doing was developing a door plug for Blackhawk Helicopters,” Ogle shares. “Blackhawks normally come with a sliding cargo door for troop egress and ingress. We take that cargo door off and plug half of the opening and install a clamshell door similar to what you would see on a Learjet or a Citation 5-style aircraft.”

Ogle says that designing a clamshell door and plug for the Blackhawk helicopter is not as easy as it seems. “Helicopters are designed to stretch, and their stress loads are transmitted from the rotor system to the rest of the airframe,” he says. “The aircraft is designed to withstand those stress loads. If you put a solid member in a place where it wasn’t originally designed, those stress loads are transmitted into the frame and will cause stress and fatigue cracks at that location.”

The design concept for the door plug was based on a request from a customer to develop a solution for the cracking they were having in the area with a previously installed rigid structure.

To overcome the issue of fatigue and stress loads, Sabreliner designed a three-piece frame assembly that is restricted in the left, right and forward axes, but is not hard attached to the lateral direction. “It actually floats as the cabin stretches and retracts through a series of pins and bearings,” Ogle explains. “We incorporated a three-piece shear wall that allows the skin to do the same thing. To someone sitting in the aircraft, it is totally transparent — it appears as a solid structure. But the design allows the aircraft to continue in its design mode as far as stress loads, all while providing the advantages of having a closed cabin for better seat configuration for VIP transport.”

Sabreliner also does helicopter strip-and-paint work and performs helicopter engine work for heavy lift like S-64 Sky Cranes. There are around 30 employees involved in the helicopter maintenance side of Sabreliner.

New Hires

We asked Ogle what he looks for in a new hire. “Integrity is big,” he shares. “We also look people that have experience in the type/model aircraft we are hiring for. We look for either military experience or a civilian background. On the civilian side, we look for certifications — an A&P/IA or, if avionics, an FCC license. We also look for some type of work history that shows that they have the work experience needed to work on aircraft.”

Continual Improvement

“Whether for your employees of yourself, you should always look for continual self-improvement,” says Ogle.

We asked Ogle if he thinks a college degree or other higher-education pursuit is critical to a successful aviation maintenance career. “My personal opinion is that a mechanic with 20 years’ experience is always going to outweigh someone that goes to school and has a doctorate degree,” he says. “Practical experience goes so much further. You cannot read what the popping sound of a compressor stall sounds like. I believe it is a mix between experience and formal training. In aviation maintenance, practical experience outweighs a piece of paper any day of the week.

“For instance,” he continues, “there are several ways you can get an A&P. You can sit in a classroom for 12 months and go through a structured A&P course. Or, you could go out in the field and work for 30 months and go to your FDSO to get authorization to take your A&P test. I believe that person with 30 months experience is going to have more knowledge than someone that sat in a class and learned what a rivet pattern is. Learning how to lay out a rivet pattern and laying out a rivet pattern are two different things.”

Management Success

We asked Ogle if his 23 years in the Army was instrumental in his success as an aviation maintenance manager. “It goes back to formal education versus experience,” he says. “In all the time I spent in school, nothing taught me leadership. A definition of leadership is ‘The art of influencing someone to gain their willing obedience to accomplish a task.’ There is nothing in a formal degree that teaches that. The military teaches leadership and the importance of procedures. Those are necessary in successful management.”

Mentoring Employees

D.O.M.magazine asked Ogle how he helps mentor employees. “The most important thing is to lead by example,” he says. “That is the biggest mentorship tool you have. Don’t tell someone to do something you wouldn’t do yourself. If it is a first-time task, show them how to do it, and give them an opportunity to put their two cents in so they can grow. Communication is a two-way street. Get input from those that work for you. Be open to the point your subordinates can talk to you freely. Humility is the biggest trait a leader can have.”

Management Tips

We asked Ogle what tips he would give someone to be a successful leader. “Be honest,” he says. “The first time you lie to somebody is the first time they will never believe anything you say again. Be open. Don’t be afraid to share bad news. Bad news doesn’t get better with time.

Full version at http://www.dommagazine.com/article/tracy-ogle-vice-president-strategic-development-helicopter-services-sabreliner-corporation

St. Louis, MO / June 13, 2013 – Sabreliner delivered two highly-modified UH-60M Blackhawk helicopters earlier this year bringing their total number of VVIP helicopter completions to 11. The aircraft feature a Sabreliner-developed executive entry system and complete cabin entertainment systems.

The maneuverability of the Blackhawk helicopter along with Sabreliner's interior design and fabrication expertise have proved to be a winning combination for clients seeking a helicopter with a VVIP configuration.

"The airframe meets both the security and tactical needs of these VVIPs, and Sabreliner's custom interiors provide the level of quality and luxury expected by this audience," said Tracy Ogle, vice president helicopter services.

Sabreliner developed a frame-load isolation design which allows the combat-proven Blackhawk to be converted into VVIP transport aircraft for heads of state around the world. They also created executive entry clam-shell doors with integrated steps which maximize the space in the cabin for executive seating and work surfaces. The two Jordanian aircraft also incorporate a full cadre of entertainment systems that display iPod content and DVDs on both individual and 17-inch cabin-mounted monitors. An iridium phone system allows conference calling.

Sabreliner Corporation: With locations in Perryville, Ste. Genevieve, and St. Mary, MO, Sabreliner Corporation is a diversified aviation services company recognized worldwide for its extensive expertise and capabilities for government, military and business aviation customers. Specializing in airframe, engine, and component modification, inspection, repair, and overhaul, Sabreliner is widely recognized for its ability to keep veteran aircraft in service while being equally qualified to perform aircraft completions to the highest standards. Sabreliner offers complete exterior paint services, interior redesign, as well as major avionics upgrades and installations. The company is a full-service maintenance, repair and overhaul facility.

Sabreliner’s extensive in-house engineering and manufacturing capabilities enable it to fabricate airframe structural assemblies, parts and tooling for use in new fixed and rotary-wing aircraft production, and for repair and overhaul of existing aircraft. Parts and assemblies are produced in accordance with government specifications, under license from OEMs and under FAA Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA). For more information, visit www.sabreliner.com or call 314-863-6880.

St. Louis, MO / May 29, 2013 – As part of its Center for Aircraft Structural Life Extension (CAStLE) contract with the United States Air Force, Sabreliner Corporation recently achieved a milestone when it concluded the largest and most comprehensive teardown effort ever conducted for the U.S. Air Force on a KC-135 Stratotanker.  

The project included a structural teardown analysis of a KC-135 Stratotanker including summarizing the findings in a 1,437-page final report. The structural teardown will help Government officials determine the current condition and long-term structural viability of the fleet with the goal of flying these aircraft through 2040. A full-scale teardown on an additional KC-135 is currently underway at Sabreliner's      Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, operation.

"Our Ste. Genevieve facilities are where Sabreliner workers breathe new life into older aircraft operated by the U.S. Air Force, Navy and others," said Susan Aselage, Sabreliner president.

Under its current contract, Sabreliner's scope of work includes engineering tasks and research activities for aging structures initiated by the USAF and CAStLE. The research and engineering activities performed by CAStLE cover a variety of tasks that follow aircraft and other structures through their life cycle from cradle to grave.

Also in Ste. Genevieve, Sabreliner is building replacement KC-135 rudders and producing replacement center wing assemblies for the P-3 Orion aircraft flown by the U.S. Navy, other U.S. agencies and allied governments.

The Ste. Genevieve operation has a long history of service to the military. In prior contracts, Sabreliner technicians conducted exhaustive inspections and made repairs to critical flight control components for the Air Force KC-135 and Navy E-6B, both military derivatives of the Boeing 707 aircraft. Flaps, ailerons, horizontal stabilizers and other structural components were removed from the aircraft elsewhere and delivered to Sabreliner facilities, where technicians stripped the existing paint and conducted extensive inspections including peeling back the sheet metal skin to look for any damage or weaknesses. The components were restored to like-new condition, repainted and returned to military bases and other facilities for reinstallation on the original aircraft, making the aircraft ready for more years of service to the nation.

Sabreliner Corporation: With locations in Perryville, Ste. Genevieve, and St. Mary, MO, Sabreliner Corporation is a diversified aviation services company recognized worldwide for its extensive expertise and capabilities for government, military and business aviation customers. Specializing in airframe, engine, and component modification, inspection, repair, and overhaul, Sabreliner is widely recognized for its ability to keep veteran aircraft in service while being equally qualified to perform aircraft completions to the highest standards. Sabreliner offers complete exterior paint services and interior redesign, as well as major avionics upgrades and installations.

Sabreliner’s extensive in-house engineering and manufacturing capabilities enable it to fabricate airframe structural assemblies, parts and tooling for use in new fixed and rotary-wing aircraft production, and for repair and overhaul of existing aircraft. Parts and assemblies are produced in accordance with government specifications, under license from OEMs and under FAA Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA). For more information, visit www.sabreliner.com or call 314-863-6880.

Contact: Ann Hein 314-578-4975 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

dubailogo

Please visit with Sabreliner at the upcoming Dubai Helishow's 2012 Helicopter Technology & Operations Exhibition to learn more about our capabilities as one of the premier Modification, Refurbishment, and Repair services provider in the helicopter industry.  We are located at booth C101.

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